Licensing Occupations: Ensuring Quality or Restricting Competition? Licensing Occupations: Ensuring Quality or Restricting Competition?
Morris M. Kleiner
First Chapter | Table of Contents

195 pp. 2006
$40.00 cloth 978-0-88099-285-5
$18.00 paper 978-0-88099-284-8

A "Noteworthy Book in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics," 2006, Industrial Relations Section – Princeton University

"Morris Kleiner has produced the most thorough evaluation of the effects of occupational licensing in years, perhaps ever. In a rational world, this book would provoke interest by policymakers and the public in reconsidering where occupational licensing is beneficial for society, and where it is beneficial for those lucky enough to be granted licenses but not for society as a whole." –Alan B. Krueger, Princeton University

"If you thought licensing was a boring minor issue in the labor market, this book will make you think again. Kleiner shows that a larger proportion of the workforce is licensed than is in unions, and that licensing raises wages and lowers employment without demonstrably improving the quality of services." –Richard B. Freeman, Harvard University

"All facts and potential consequences of licensing occupations will be better understood after reading this wonderful and timely book." –Francis Kramarz, Crest-Insee and Ecole Polytechnique, France

"In Licensing Occupations, Morris Kleiner opens the way for a long-overdue national dialogue on the efficacy of the U.S. professional and occupational regulatory system. His work will surely excite numerous and varied responses from public protection stakeholders." –Pam Brinegar, Council on Licensure, Enforcement, and Regulation (CLEAR)

"Occupational licensure is stealth regulation. It has a profound impact on labor markets and prices without getting nearly the scrutiny that other labor market interventions do. Morris Kleiner has brought the light of day to this increasingly important topic, laying out the history and economic impact of the steady rise in the number of licensed occupations. In the process, he asks the most important question of all: Is this good for consumers?" –Charles Wheelan, Harris School of Public Policy, University of Chicago

"In this magisterial book Morris Kleiner documents what we know about the impact of occupational licensing and presents his own research findings. Kleiner is particularly good on international comparisons. His detailed analysis of licensing in France, Germany and the UK suggests there are much lower wage effects of licensing in the EU than in the U.S. This is a consequence of more intense EU regulation of prices charged and of the organisational structure of the professions." –David Metcalf, London School of Economics